Category Archives: equity

Jim and Jillian Dellit established this website to bring together their various endeavours, to engage with and contribute to the educational community and educational delivery. Jillian is continuing this work both in her own right, and to keep faith with Jim's life, 1947-2014, and their productive partnership 1970-2014.

Blog Archives

May 6

More than education posted by Jillian in Assessment, Education policy, Education reform, equity

My beliefs about the role of education in a democratic society have guided my own education, my subsequent career and the way I conduct my life. I have worked locally, at a state and a national level to structure and … Continue reading

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December 6

Education that serves the community posted by Jillian in Education policy, Education reform, equity, History of Education, Secondary schooling

I recently attended the 50 year reunion of my high school Leaving class from a selective state girls’ school in Sydney. Although the group has met every decade since leaving school, this is the first I have attended. I have … Continue reading

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September 9

Bring your own technology: build your own social capital. posted by Jillian in Education policy, Education reform, equity, parents, technology in education

The recent ACER publication Bring Your Own Technology: The BYOT guide for schools and families by Mal Lee and Martin Levins has triggered some useful online discussion. Mal Lee, whose writings in professional journals will be familiar to a majority … Continue reading

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February 8

Learning Analytics posted by Jillian in Education reform, equity, technology in education

The New Media Consortium’s 2011 K-12 Horizon Report identified Learning Analytics as a tool likely to impact on schools within a three to five year period. Learning analytics brings tools widely used in marketing and the high-end security industries to … Continue reading

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October 31

Doing time: do Australian working class kids need more time at school? posted by Jim in ACARA, Education policy, Education reform, equity, Primary schooling, Secondary schooling, technology in education, Uncategorized

In September this year, six Chicago Public Schools joined an increasing movement in the United States and Canada to extend the amount of time students spend in contact with their teachers, and school-based learning.  In 2012, all Chicago public schools will … Continue reading

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September 15

Professional aspirations, expectations and goodwill: enter new graduate teachers stage left posted by Jim in Education reform, equity, Primary schooling, Secondary schooling, technology in education, Uncategorized

This blog is both dedicated and directed to the graduating students from the Grad Dip Secondary at the University of Canberra. This is, in a sense, a Ceremonial Graduation Blog: including some advice to young graduates. The University of Canberra’s … Continue reading

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August 20

It doesn’t have to be like this posted by Jillian in Education reform, equity

  In 1986, while working in the Equal Opportunity Unit of the South Australian Education Department, Margaret Wallace and I conducted a consultation with women about their schooling. We visited schools and talked to mothers of students. One woman’s response has … Continue reading

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August 10

Our concept of public education posted by Jillian in Education policy, Education reform, equity

One of the basic British reforms of the nineteenth century that enabled improvements for the middle-class and then the working-class, was the introduction of differential tax scales. 

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August 3

Our un-Australian Equity Gap posted by Jillian in ACARA, Education policy, Education reform, equity, Uncategorized

With all its shortcomings, the My School website, together with data from successive PISA results, is providing evidence that you need  more than luck to get a fair educational go in the Lucky Country.

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